SAY GOODBYE TO THE FLU


Combat the FLU with Elderberry




We are right in the middle of Flu Season so it is only right that I begin talking about ways to boost your immune system. This has honestly been one of the worse seasons I have seen with tons of Tamiflu being prescribed. So many patients have literally yelled at me in a panic since the medication became scarce and we had to compound the formulation. The truth is there is a natural way to fight the flu. Let me introduce you to one of my favorite herbs, Elberberry. Elderberry is a flower and berry with anti-viral properties used for centuries to fight the flu and other sinus infections. There are randomized, and double blinded placebo controlled studies that have shown elderberry superior in reducing the symptoms of the flu (clink on links below for more). Before entering the pharmacy for work, I place the supplement in my tea or water and drink at least 3 times a week. I am always exposed to those that are very sick and suffering from viruses and infection. It is very important that my immune system is always strong. I think of my immune system as a wall of very strong soldiers and viruses and infection trying to break my wall down. If I fortify my system with reinforcements the less likely my wall will come down. I have used elderberry for the past 7 years during flu season and have not contracted the virus at all. Elderberry is safe for use in children as well. Make sure to use the alcohol-free formulation, especially when using in children. Pick up a bottle today. If you are having trouble finding it, head to this link here.


Purchase by clicking here:


You will be glad you did.


This video will show you how easy it is to include Elderberry in your daily routine during flu season.


Other ways to prepare for flu season include sanitizing and washing hands, eating fruits and vegetables, eating out less, and taking vitamins and supplements.


During flu season, so many get infected simply because they placed their hands on top of counter someone just sneezed on and rubbed their nose, or wiped their face after shaking someone's hand. WASHING HANDS is the first and primary way to prevent the flu from spreading. Also keeping your work space clean and home clean can also prevent the virus from spreading. Using sanitizing wipes kill the flu virus you may be unknowingly bringing in from work to your home.


The Flu season begins in August and ends the end of March to the beginning of April. Before the flu season begins, load up on your fruit and vegetable intake. Fruits and vegetables naturally boost the immune system and gives your body the nutrients it needs to fight the virus. Adding a vitamin C supplement to your daily vitamins will also boost your immune system. If you are not taking a regular multivitamin, I would highly recommend you start today. The benefits are endless from boosting energy to fighting free radicals. Are you getting sick all the time? If so, your diet is likely in need of reformation and you need to add a multivitamin to gain more nutrition. Usually when I ask recurrently sick patients if they take a multivitamin, the answer is NO. Such a simple investment can make the difference in how you fare during flu season. I recommend vitamins from NatureMade since this is one of the few companies backed by the USP (United States Pharmacopeia).


Another precaution to take during flu season is to eat out less. In our society, convenience is everything and food usually falls in that bracket. However, during flu season, you are never sure who is behind the counter making your meal. You would hope most restaurants practice ethical standards and remove sick employees, however, some people don't even know they are sick and are making your food. Take the time to cook your own meals or plan ahead to limit your exposure to the flu. You may have to eat out, but limiting the times you do reduces your exposure.


The time to be proactive about the FLU season is now!


Would love to hear your feedback and questions below!


Studies:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27023596

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15080016

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3056848/


Monique Diltz